Venturer Torpedo

The model of a torpedo presented to Lieutenant “Jimmy” Launders DSO*, DSC* Royal Navy, Commanding Officer of HMS Venturer which sank U-864 on 9 February 1945, was formally handed over to Alex Geary one of the submarine archivists with the National Museum of the Royal Navy by Jock McLees, Vice Chairman of the Friends’ committee. The model was bought at auction by the National Museum for the Royal Navy Submarine Museum funded by a donation from the Friends of the RNSM. This artefact is of particular significance as it marks the only occasion upon which one submarine sank another while both were submerged.

Jock McLees hands over the model to Alex Geary

Nick Hewitt, NMRN Head of Exhibitions, writes:

“I am so very grateful to the Friends of the Royal Navy Submarine Museum for supporting this important acquisition, which commemorates a unique event: the only time in history that one submarine, the Royal Navy’s HMS/M VENTURER, sank another (U-864) from a submerged position: an achievement which involved skill, persistence, courage and surely a little luck! NMRN is committed to collecting material which helps us tell the story of the Submarine Service, but this opportunity came along at an awkward time in the financial year for our purchasing budgets, so without the help of the Friends we would have lost this wonderful object. Thank you!”

2 Comments

david.j.parry@gmail.com

Some relevant notes:
Hezlet, op. cit, p.313 and Ballantyne, Iain, Hunter Killers, London, Orion, 2013, p.17. The U-864 was fitted with a ‘schnorchel’ (American: snorkel; British: snort) but had an engine that was misfiring and making a loud noise (she was heading back into Norway for repairs). Launders detected U-864 on Venturer’s hydrophones (sonar) while she was snorting, confirmed it was a submarine contact when he saw her periscope, and then tracked her by sonar for an hour before firing a four-torpedo salvo at 2000 yards with the torpedoes set at depths between 30 and 36 feet. Kolshkin, Rear Admiral Ivan, Submarines in Arctic Waters, Amsterdam, Fredonia, 2005, pp. 227-228. The accolade of the very first passive (bearings only) asdic attack must probably go to the Soviet submarine S56 (Captain 2nd Class Grigoriy Ivanovich Shchedrin). He sank a transport with one torpedo (the other had misfired) in the Barents Sea in March 1944 from a depth of 20 metres. Shchedrin had led a flotilla of six submarines from the Pacific to join the Red Banner Northern Fleet in March 1943 via Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and the Panama Canal. He was later Vice Admiral

Don Cleavin

The question has to be asked, was the transport ship in question running submerged at the time too !!!!
Kolshkin, Rear Admiral Ivan, Submarines in Arctic Waters, Amsterdam, Fredonia, 2005, pp. 227-228. The accolade of the very first passive (bearings only) asdic attack must probably go to the Soviet submarine S56 (Captain 2nd Class Grigoriy Ivanovich Shchedrin). He sank a transport with one torpedo (the other had misfired) in the Barents Sea in March 1944 from a depth of 20 metres. Shchedrin had led a flotilla of six submarines from the Pacific to join the Red Banner Northern Fleet in March 1943 via Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and the Panama Canal. He was later Vice Admiral

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