Hunting for UNTIRINGs

From Trevor Andrew-Gernand
Although I am have been the Welfare Officer in International Submariners Association for quite a few years now and have met many fellow boatees I have never come across anyone who was a fellow crew member who was on my first boat (HMS/M Untiring), which I joined in Portland in 1954, although I didn’t last long as I was drafted with 12 others, including Lofty Redman who just happened to be my course Instructor, to fly from RCAF North Luffenham (as it was called then), to set up Subsquad 6 in Halifax NS, in January/February 1955.

Scan_20150731Are there any ex crew members of the Untiring who remember the night when the wind was howling over Chesil Beach making the trot boats bounce against each other, which resulted in myself and other five or six duty watch having to move the boat away to secure to a buoy in the pitch black, (yes! just the five or six of us) as most of the crew had gone ashore or on weekend if my memory serves me correct. The buoy jumper was the cook, and one officer on the bridge, me on the wheel and telegraphs and others working the Doncs.

Luckily, we had quickly put together victuals supplied to last ‘til the morning, when more crew came aboard to get us back alongside wind speed had subsided. Quite an exciting time I thought, probably not for the cook jumping with the assistance of a torch light.!!

Trevor on HMS LOCH GLENDHU on Christmas day 1951 in the Gulf, wearing the Captains uniform because he just happened to be the youngest boy on board

Trevor on HMS LOCH GLENDHU on Christmas day 1951 in the Gulf, wearing the Captains uniform because he just happened to be the youngest boy on board

4 Comments

trevor

Congratulations Tom on your excellent work with this dit, and the fotos turned out better than I thought they would.

johndcumming

I served in Untiring as a Nat service Midshipman from coming out of refit in Plymouth in May 1954 under Roddy Bristowe. Worked up in Rothesay and then ran as “clockwork mouse” out of Portland. One of the highlights was an official visit to Alderney in company with Upstart and getting our guests back on to the jetty up a vertical ladder following a tide range of 20 feet! Left in September at the end of my two year stint. Stayed in the RNVR until 1971 and did regular training back in boats, retiring as Lt. Cdr RNR. My first year was spent in Anchorite – great times. Interested to learn of others who may get in touch. John Cumming.

trevor

Hi John, So at last after all these years I have found a fellow boatmate from the Untiring. It is with great regret that I can’t actually remember you personally due to the passing years, but in any case I was only aboard as an RP from June 54 to October 54 doing I suppose what was called getting used to life beneath the waves before I was drafted to Canada. I notice that you did very good in your career, not like me, I got married and had to leave!!!! Sometimes I wish that I had stayed in but there again, I wouldn’t have had the great life that I have had since 1959, with my travels etc, excluding the bad time I had living in Spain being robbed of two houses and five bar restaurants.
I am 81 now and still think I can do the things I did when I was 31!!! But am slowing down gradually. Hope you and yours are keeping well and happy, Cheers for now, keep in touch, Trevor

johndcumming

Even RPs probably didn’t recognize lowly Temporary Acting Probationary Midshipmen RNVRs. I seem to remember CERA Maxwell was our “engineer officer”, Lenny Hough was Cox’n, Dick Brander was 3rd Hand and Bob Gartside was “ping bosun” but, as you say, memories fade at 81! John C.

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